People of London-King's Cross,Camden, & The Underground

When walking the streets of London in King’s Cross and Camden there is a strange sense of equanimity that lies under the surface of what seems to be a tumultuous city with no direction. Everyone excepts what is; everyone excepts the life style at be. Even the ones who sit homeless on the streets. As I roam the city with the intent of capturing the truth, and reality of contemporary London, I realize that to truly express what it is I am experiencing, I have to keep in mind the myriad of factors that come into play if I am trying to captivate the best photographs possible. I have to blend in. The way you dress, what you carry, and how you walk, dictates what others think of you on the streets. I decided that I would go out with only my camera… no backpack. The backpack is a sign of tourism, and unfortunately so is the camera. Today, walking around with a high quality camera brings new challenges to practicing street photography. In this day and age, everyone is aware of the implications photos hold, and the possibility of the mass promotion a photo can gain on the internet. Social Media has given the entire world the ability to take, and distribute digital photos when, and where ever they please. So, do to the fact, many who walk the streets are more self conscious of how they are pictorially expressed on the internet. *** I try and get various different styles of photos. I get some of people that will never know they where captivated by me, and this is a beautiful form of portrait. To catch someone while they are in their true skin, while they are walking as if no one was paying attention, brings a lovely truth too their actions. Their are some people you can tell if they would want their photo taken or not. I can feel their energy, and some would rather keep their energy private. If I can tell right of the back that they would rather stay hidden, then I keep the camera down at my waist, and admire them with my intrinsic bodily senses only. I feel as if I have a responsibility to respect the people at large. So that is why I also try and practice asking people for their own volition. Not only does asking change the probability of capturing the photo, but it also opens up a window for conversation. Some say yes, some say no, and when they say yes, beautiful stories arise out of people you may never expect to be compelling. I never take a photo of them if they tell me no. I must keep my respect for their privacy. Some people don't mind what so ever if they are captured, and the ones who give me permission with eye contact and body language only, are truly some of the most unique, and confident spirits of London. It is also interesting when I found people who where open for their photo to be taken… before I had even spotted them. A couple asked me near the entrance of the Underground if I would take their portrait. They clearly saw something in me that they related to, and this is why I say appearance is key. We gained a connection quickly, and I got to once agin, experience beautiful people with beautiful souls. Their a many stories behind these photographs, stories of people that will someday be forgotten, but if my connection to them through artistic expression can make them live longer in time, then I have achieved what I set out to achieve… a surreal documentation. With this exhibition, I wish to express a dreamy, and ambiguous view into London and its people.

"Photography is seen as an acute manifestation of the individualized "I," the homeless private self astray in an overwhelming world- mastering reality by fast visual anthologizing of it." - Susan Sontag

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